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PBS
Apr 12, 2010 12:30pm EDT
really does have an independent streak. >> rose: we continue with a look at the future of latin america with john coatsworth dean of columbia university international and public affair, kevin cassas zamora of the brookings institution and former vice president of costa rica, greg grandin at new york university and michael shifter, incoming president of the interamerican dialogue. justice stevens and latin america, coming up. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the coca-cola company. supporting this program since 2002. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is chaálie rose. >> justice john paul stevens today announced his retirement from the supreme court. he had been on the court 34 years. he was known as the leader of the liberal wing. he is the fourth longest serving justice in u.s. history. he was appointed by republican president gerald ford but he was hardly beholden to conservatives. "the new york times" wrote that he may be the last justice from a time when the independence rather than perceived ideology were perceived a
PBS
Apr 15, 2010 12:30pm EDT
and doing well at this. but at the same time all the countries in the me john know america plays an indispensable role and we'd like america to continue to do that. >> rose: a conversation about china, the united states, asia, and the world with the prime minister of singapore when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: singapore's prime minister lee hsein loong is here. he is in the united states this week for the nuclear security summit and for meetings with american officials, including the secretary of state. he's been prime minister since 2004, he's only the city state's third prime minister. he is the son of lee kwan yue, singapore's founding father. i am pleased to have him back on this broadcast with me while he's making this visit to washington. welcome. >> hello. >> rose: tell me what you think was accomplished at this summit of 46 nations. >> i think president obama did the world a service. this is an issue, nuclear security and nuclear terrorism which is important but not urgent. it's
PBS
Apr 2, 2010 10:00pm EDT
: two champions of justice on the state of equality in america. >> not much has changed, or will change, for the folks at the bottom of the well. >> the opposite of poverty is not wealth. i think in america, the opposite of poverty is justice. >> moyers: stay tuned. >> from our studios in new york, bill moyers. >> moyers: welcome to "the journal". on this weekend, 42 years ago, dr. martin luther king jr. was assassinated-- gunned down in memphis, tennessee. many of us still have the images etched in painful memory-- dr. king standing with colleagues on the balcony of the lorraine motel, the next day lying there mortally wounded, his aides pointing in the direction of the rifle shot. >> everybody wants freedom. >> moyers: then we remember the crowds of mourners slowly moving through the streets of atlanta on a hot sunny day, surrounding king's casket as it was carried on a mule-drawn farm wagon; and the riots that burned across the nation in the wake of his death; a stinging, misbegotten rebuke to his gospel of non-violence. we sanctify his memory now, name streets and schools after him,
PBS
Apr 1, 2010 12:00pm EDT
not think any true picture of equality in america alone is simply the picture of black and white america, although we think that is the most important historical lens through which to look at the quality, but there is the growing hispanic and latino communities. secondly, my gut tells me, my political instincts tell me that a relationship, a working relationship, between the hispanic community and the black community around issues is something that is good for us and good for the nation. that does not mean that there are not going to be some places where we disagree, where our views may not exactly meche, but it is important as we look at the quality -- where our views may not exactly mesh. what the hispanic quality index shows is a wider situation which is not quite as large as between whites and african-americans. all of the numbers that are available for black america and whitemerica are not available for hispanic americans, so the index is not a perfect match, but it models the index that we have had for the last six or seven years when it comes to the relationship between black and
PBS
Apr 16, 2010 5:30pm EDT
in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- as rescue teams approach the rubble, two days after the quake in china's remote northwest, the incredible tale of one little girl's survival. and the election campaign in the u.k. picks up with northern ireland finding out what westminster means there. hello to you. still there, still problem, and may be spreading. the club of volcanic ash from iceland drifting across europe will cause destruction well into the weekend. flights have been canceled, but there planes in scotland and ireland are reopening. much of europe remains grounded for some time yet, and the cloud is spreading south and east. we have this from our correspondent. >> the menacing column is still rising into the skies above iceland. the irruption it shows no sign of slowing down. -- the irruption shows no sign of slowing down. it is likely that flights will be disrupted for the next two days. there are windows of clear air. this evening flying will resume in scotland, but not the rest of the uk >> the volcano continues to erupt into e
PBS
Apr 29, 2010 5:30pm EDT
to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. coming up later in the program -- the world comes to shanghai. we take all look at the futuristic opening. he says he has not eaten in 74 years. could it be true? britain's final prime ministerial debate is under way this evening with a focus on the economy. there is only a week until polling day with many voters still undecided. is a final chance for the three leaders to get their policies across. prime minister gordon brown will be trying to redeem himself after the disaster is gaffe yesterday when he called a lifelong labor supporter "the biggest." -- "a bigot." >> i am listening to the debate with the rest of the journalists here. and namely this is about bankers and their bonuses. obviously a lot of rhetoric sang the financial crisis was very unfair -- saying the financial crisis was very unfair. gordon brown began by saying the prime minister and had a difficult job to do and he did not always get things right. he unexpectedly insulted of voter yesterday, not knowing his remarks would be carried for everyone to hear. and
PBS
Apr 6, 2010 12:00pm EDT
, and yet, we keep seeing signs of inching up more and more inside of black america. what do we do about those americans who are hardest by this recession? >> those figures are telling. you mentioned them, and we really need to step up to the plate, and so, providing some assistance, for example, for infrastructure, to make sure that those jobs are available. also, small businesses, to make sure that within the black community and beyond that money is available for small businesses. we have a lot to do, a lot to do, because the unemployment rate has stabilized, and jobs have gone up, but we have a long ways to go, because when you include people who have given up looking for work, the unemployment rate is even worse. you know, this administration inherited a terribly deep hole, the worst since the depression, and we have been trying to dig out of this whole. it is not going to happen overnight, but we have to keep building the foundation here, and i think this administration is determined to do it. it is often tough. there have been some tough votes here, but it took a lot because the ho
PBS
Apr 9, 2010 12:00pm EDT
is they are right, but what does this say about our discourse in america? >> we are playing with big space. i am playing in this game, too, and we are debating the future shape of the republican party, the kind of party it is going to be, and that involves whether or not we're going to take account of this health care problem, so i think there's a lot at stake and i understand why people feel strongly. i have no complaints. i think what we have to decide as republicans -- if someone has given you bad advice, get them out of the building, but maybe it is good advice, and i can make the case may be the vice i was offered was the right advice. >> what do you make of all the turmoil existing now in the republican party? they are calling for the ouster of michael steele, the parti's share -- party's chair. is happening on the right as you see it? >> let me talk about michael steele, who has made many steps in -- missteps. i will defend him. i think the republican party needs him. it need him as a voice and a symbol. we just had a sharp reminder of why that is so. gov. bob macdonald of virginia, someo
PBS
Apr 7, 2010 12:30pm EDT
unique because if you look to america the biggest newspaper, "u.s.a. today" and "wall street journal" reach about approximately 3.5 million readers per day. the biggest t.v. show "america's got talent" i think is reaching 11.7, something like that. in germany, there's no t.v. that reaches everyday as much readers as "bild." it's a unique brand, a very strong marketplace. so we said let's use this figure in order to make our 12 million readers potential reporters. so we asked them to send us stories, particularly to send us video content, to send us photos. until today, more than 600,000 photos have been sent. we have printed 18,000. >> rose: am i going to want to read your publications here? or am i going to read in the print? >> you know what? i don't mind. i see ourselves as content producers, branded content producers, marketeers of branded content and if more and more readers will prefer to read it on tablet devices, i like it. because we save printing costs. we save distribution costs, we save paper costs. so in a way it is boosting our business. >> rose: but isn't it inevitable
PBS
Apr 9, 2010 12:30pm EDT
and america, and president obama from a historical perspective next. >> funding for charlie rose has been provided by the coming. if you've had a coke in the last 20 years, ( screams ) you've had a hand in giving college scholarships... and support to thousands of our nation's... most promising students. ♪ ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama and his russian counterpart president medvedev signed an arms reduction treaty in prague practicaling for nations to trim their stockpiles. about 30% less than currently allowed. this would bring the two countries arsenals to their lowest levels since the end of the cold war. the treaty still has to be ratified by lawmakers in both countries, though the two sides disagree over the future of u.s. missile defense plan, obama medvedev said the fact was a sign of improving relations. >> our relationship had started to drift making it difficult to cooperate on issues of common interest to our people. and when the united states and russi
PBS
Apr 13, 2010 9:00pm EDT
change. >> your voice can create the kind of america we dream about. >> then he took on one of washington's toughest issues. >> let's be the generation that says, "we will have universal health care in america." we can do that. >> what happened next surprised everyone. >> the only way they could get it through was to bribe their members. >> hundreds of millions of dollars spent on lobbying. >> very political, very aggressive at creating deals. >> those deals can be pretty smelly. >> another day, another headache for president obama. >> is this just the dirty reality of politics? >> news of a back room deal. >> all those back room deals, it's just wrong and we can do better. >> there was a wake-up call that president obama wasn't everything that they thought he was. >> the president has staked his entire first term on this. >> there's always two sides of obama. you have to lift up people, but at the end of the day, it is about deal-making. >> tonight on frontline, "obama's deal." >> what's at stake right now is not just our ability to solve this problem, but our ability to solve any proble
PBS
Apr 30, 2010 5:30pm EDT
," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. ahead, a spectacular opening for the shanghai expo 2010, china tries to reinforce its chelal galt influence. and vietnam marks -- and china tries to reinforce its global influence. and vietnam marks 35 years since the fall of saigon. >>> a huge oil slick in the gulf of mexico is washing ashore in the american state of louisiana. four southern states are being menaced by the oil slick which is a threatening environmental and economic disaster. at the white house says no new offshore drilling will be authorized until a full investigation has been done into this bill perry >> evening, the threat of ecological disaster hangs over this entire region of the u.s. i just got back from seeing the oil slick. it is still growing, still heading towards land. along a massive stretch of coastline, the future of some of the most fragile x systems hangs in the balance. at the marshlands where the mississippi river flows into the gulf are home to hundreds of species. today, the oil is approaching their delicate world. it is spreading out from a ruptured pi
PBS
Apr 15, 2010 6:00pm EDT
: >> every business day, bank of america lends nearly $3 billion to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses in every corner of the economy. america-- growing stronger everyday. this is the engine that connects zero emission technologies to breathing a little easier, while taking 4.6 million truckloads off the road every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: air travel across parts of europe was virtually halted today by an erupting volcano in iceland. the sweeping shutdown was the worst since 9/11. it's ripple effects stranded travelers on six continents. we have a report from kylie morris of independent television news. >> reporter: directly under transatlantic flights, the otherworldly ayefiyalla yok
PBS
Apr 16, 2010 7:00pm EDT
for acquisitions. bank of america was the other big earnings report out today. it easily beat expectations. similar to j.p. morgan earlier in the week, b. of a.'s profit strength came from its investment banking business. shares of b.a.c. got swept up in the goldman story, and it did huge volume: more than 500 million shares, dropping more than 5%. the bank set aside less money for bad loans compared to last quarter. coming into today, the market focus was on google after last night's earnings, which failed to impress. the stock felt that, dropping to a three-week low on three times volume. all three of these stocks-- google, bank of america, and g.e.-- are popular u.s. stock mutual fund holdings. google is the eighth most widely held in funds. bank of america, number nine, and g.e. the 26th, according to morningstar. a couple of ports of shelter in today's storm: consumer stocks and health care. coca-cola stock headed higher. it has earnings tuesday. kellogg's results aren't due until the week after next. it saw buying on heavier than usual volume. in health care, boston scientific rallied after t
PBS
Apr 19, 2010 12:30pm EDT
fault, really." they came out of their bunker to swear they didn't sell america short so what do you make of this? >> i didn't expect the s.e.c. to come out with the big howitzer today the way it did. goldman, i thought, at least could take comfort or defense in the esoteric of this, how hard it is to go home and explain to your mother, i have to use metaphors like wall street turning out tainted hamburger meat and by the end of the conversation the per is more confused than the beginning of the conversation. goldman is relying on a defense of diffusion of responsibility-- "how were we to know it was it was going to fall apart." the ratings agencies were supposed to tell us these were not as robust as they were. if you peel down the layers of the deal, you realize there was another mechanism that goldman and paulson cold. you have a patsy in that trade in effect, and i'm pretty struck that the s.e.c. was aggressive as it was getting to the heart of the trade. >> rose: the s.e.c.. does this represent because they've been under such attack over the last several years, a new aggressive
PBS
Apr 6, 2010 5:30pm EDT
viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. our other news. maoist leaders killed 75 paramilitary troops in india. it looks as they walked into a trap. seven bombings of seven buildings in baghdad in what looks like a deliberate attack on the shiite areas. two women are are arrested for trying to smuggle a dead relative onto a plane in liverpool. hello to you from downing street where a few hours ago the british prime minister stood with his cabinet and announce the date of an election not quite like any other in british political history. there are weeks of hard campaigning ahead until the country votes on may 6. it could be the closest of -- closest vote in 20 years. it will make history. there are going to be tv debates between the party leaders for the first time. this is the first real social networking collection. all of this at a time when the electorate is very widespread. there is the scandal over mp expenses. the labor party is the traditional party of the left. it is seeking a fourth term in power. gordon brown took over the leadership for tony blair two years ago. on t
PBS
Apr 15, 2010 5:30pm EDT
. welcome to, "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america. president obama lays out his new vision for nasa. and celebrating one of fashion's icons, more than 50 years after she stepped down in style, grace kelly in the spotlight again. >>> air travel across northern europe has been hugely disruptive by the ash clouds from an erupting volcano in iceland. half of all trans-atlantic flights are expected to be canceled friday. because of the danger that the cloud could bring down aircraft, the u.k. has closed its airspace to everything except emergency services. similar restrictions have grounded airplanes across europe. thousands of passengers had their travel plans bract. this report from peter biles. >> an unprecedented site, all but emergency flights in and out of the united kingdom ground. the risk posed by the all stannic a volcanic eruption has forced -- by the islamic volcanic eruption has forced drastic measures. in france, the airports were all affected. >> essentially, it means another night in paris. it is a little bit of a pain. >> throughout the day, more and more flight
PBS
Apr 22, 2010 12:00pm EDT
of the taxpayer dollars, we won't waste a single one. we are trying to be good stewards in our 2.2% of america, and best i can tell, folks here do appreciate that indiana is in a lot better shape than most states and you have to make common sense decisions to stay that way. tavis: what is the health care of this newly passed health c e karen depaucare on the state of indiana. >> i don't think it will be good for america, i think it will aggregate the worse problems of high cost and overconsumption of health care. our state will cost millions of dollars and lead to low-insureded and will lead to health care. i don't think it was a good conceived bill, and i am sorry they passed it. tavis: i will take from your comment that you are opposed from this legislation, i will take it that indiana was doing a good job to make sure that most hoosiers had health care? >> we were gaining on it, we have a program different than this national program, it's based on individual accounts that manage their own money and decisions. and totally protective. and it's very popular with the 50,000 people, the first
PBS
Apr 22, 2010 5:30pm EDT
audience to join him and not fight, but had some pretty harsh words for america's financial sector. >> the free market was never meant to be a free license to take what ever you can get however you can get it. that is what happened to often in the years leading up to this crisis and not all, but some on wall street forgot that behind every dollar traded there has been a family looking to buy a house or pay for an education. open a business and save for retirement. what happens on wall street has real consequences across the country. >> mr. obama said the reform is not nearly about size, preventing firms from becoming too big to fail, but also about attitude, stopping reckless risk-taking. >> we will continue to see what amounts to highly leveraged gambling in our financial system. putting tax payers in jeopardy. the only people who ought to fear the oversight and transparency we are proposing are those whose conduct will fail. >> my guest has had [inaudible] assistant secretary of international affairs. what do you make of president obama's push for fundamental reform? >> you have
PBS
Apr 27, 2010 5:30pm EDT
with the deficit. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. i am peter dobbie. coming up later for your -- fistfights he oread ukraine lawmakers come to blows. and forgotten in pakistan. we report from one of the nation's biggest camps for the displaced. the news today is dominated by three big financial stories, all with potentially huge consequences. first, the embattled investment bank goldman sachs repeatedly put its own interests ahead of its clients' interests. that was the start of a stinging attack delivered by u.s. senators as they began grilling several of the bank's executives. goldman sachs is accused of profiting from the recent housing disaster. the bank denies the allegations. from washington, adam brooks now reports. >> goldman sachs is well and truly in at the dock now. the government's charged the firm with fraud for its role in the financial crisis. all eyes were on this man. fabrice tourre, 31-year-old french employee of goldman sachs who called goldman fabulous -- who called himself fabulous fab. day he showed little contrit
PBS
Apr 29, 2010 12:00pm EDT
soldiers with paul rieckhoff, founder of veterans of america. also tonight, alex gibney is here. it is called "casino jack and the united states of money." that is coming out right now. >> there are so many things walmart is looking for to doing, like helping people live better. we are looking forward to helping people build strong communities. the best is yet to come. >> nationwide insurance proudly supports tavis smiley. nationwide insurance, working to improve the economic empowerment. >> nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: paul rieckhoff is the founder of the veterans of america which is holding let's second annual heroes' celebration tomorrow night. hero's celebration. i was stunned to read -- we know the economy is challenging everybj@but i was shocked to lot what veterans face, those who have served their country coming back home and their unemployment numbers are through the roo
PBS
Apr 7, 2010 12:00pm EDT
into america. get jobs for young frarnse. get education for latinos. create a resolution where we fix our bridges and streets. you can still save money if you have taking that money out of these hopeless wars that can not be won the way they are being fought. tavis: i didn't know that we were going to engage in a conversation that goes around the king documentary. i'm glad you saw it, though. let me dig a little deeper and ask a couple of questions. as you can imagine, i received all kinds of email mostly from thanking us for having done the piece. are organizations like al qaeda -- have made diplomacy useless? whether or not organizations like al qaeda have made the notion of nonviolence altogether obsolete and useless. the point i'm getting at here is the kind of enemy we are dealing with today, we agree that martin luther king was not an absolute passvist. how they do their deeds. does that -- the very stoil in which they operate make diplomacy nonviolence absolutely use whether he is. >> i don't remember negotiating successfully with hitler. there are a lot of evil people in history.
PBS
Apr 12, 2010 12:00pm EDT
was very big in europe, certainly big in latin america, certainly big in north america. his next final frontier would have been ace asia. he had a couple outposts. a few more years, the asians would become big victims. they were lucky and escaped. there were hundreds of people, if not thousands that knew madoff was a fraud. they need to be brought to justice. most of the perpetrators overseas will not be brought to justice and very few in north america will be brought to justice. i don't think the government has the resources to do this case and bring everybody to the bar of justice they need to. tavis: so when you suggest that persons who read your book as you have been touring around the country, understand the clear english, the clear language in which you right, that the s.e.c. should have understood if everyday folk can figure that out, do the victims, a tough question for some people to swallow, but do the victims here have any responsibility in knowing or having some idea that with a line that only goes straight up that something was wrong here, something was a little fishy here
PBS
Apr 12, 2010 7:00pm EDT
businesses and for the american public? >> well, i think most important is it indicates that america and china are again trying to work together. there is a lot more we have in common with the chinese. and they with us. then in conflict. anything that improves our relationship, makes it tighter is a good thing, long-term for our growth for global stability, jobs, inflation and all the rest. >> all right, we're going to have to leave it there, unfortunately, gentlemen, we've run out of time. but i do appreciate both of you coming on and sharing your thoughts with us. >> you bet. >> my guests tonight david hale hale. and donald straszheim of the isi group. >> tom: this weekend, before hu's visit to washington, china did something it hadn't done in almost six years-- reported a trade deficit. the asian nation said it brought in $7.25 billion more stuff in march, than it sent out. beijing says that shows the value of the yuan is not skewing trade in its favor, as some u.s. lawmakers argue. from china, nick mackie reports, watching commodity imports may hold the key to the currency policy
PBS
Apr 17, 2010 5:00am EDT
on "washington week." >> wall street took advantage of america. it's now our turn to look at wall street contributing to a better america. >> sounds simple enough. but a bank regulation bill that seems like a slam dunk only a short time ago -- >> i think we're very, very close -- gwen: has run into a partisan buzz saw on capitol hill. >> this bill wouldn't solve the problems that led to the financial crisis. it would make them worse. gwen: might the same thing happen to president obama's eventual supreme court nominee or to the plan embraced by global leaders this week to reduce nuclear weapons? but saws ever where. >> the tea party movement. gwen: much of it building under the tea party flag. >> stop calling anyone un-american. let the unintended consequences of these actions, the results are un-american. gwen: covering the week, david wessel of "the wall street journal," gloria borger of cnn, peter baker of "the new york times," and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> additional funding for "washington week" i
PBS
Apr 20, 2010 7:00pm EDT
up a structure that avoids that. secondly, we have to keep america as the best place to create capital and to create credit so that when people want to go out and take a risk and create a job, which is really what makes america unique. we have this energy in this country from people who want to take a risk and create jobs, and they can find capital and credit in a reasonable way. if we do this in the reform right, we will accomplish both those goals. again, i want to stretch. this is not a partisan issue. there is no partisan sides in this. it is just a question of getting it right and doing it in a thoughtful way, stepping back and being mature about our approach, rather than getting caught up in the hyp hyperbole of the moment. >> susie: give us a date, when do you think you'll have a vote on this? >> i presume we're going to have a vote in the next couple of weeks in the senate. there is significant progress being made between senator dodd, the chairman of the committee, and senator ranking. and others have made progress with our colleagues across the aisle on specific issue
PBS
Apr 30, 2010 7:00pm EDT
the ghost of mortgages past is coming back to haunt countrywide and its owner bank of america. a new york judge says bond insurer m.b.i.a. can sue bank of america for fraud allegedly committed by countrywide in 2005 through 2007. countrywide was bought by b. of a. in 2008, after imploding in the subprime mortgage meltdown. the bank says it shouldn't be held responsible for countrywide's problems before the deal. the judge disagreed. >> tom: cell phones are ringing up soaring sales, thanks to a recovering economy, and new smartphones. manufacturers shipped almost 300 million phones in the first quarter of the year. that's up 22% from the same period last year. one of the big beneficiaries is research is blackberry's research in motion, which for the first time is now one of the top five biggest phonemakers. the economic rebound has just begun and the stock market has more room to run. so says tonight's market monitor. he's james paulsen, chief investment strategist at wells capital management. he joins us from minneapolis. >> tom: welcome to "nightly business report," jim. >> good to be he
PBS
Apr 13, 2010 6:00pm EDT
of america were found negligent today in a sexual abuse case. a jury in portland, oregon, ordered them to pay $1.4 million to a man who said a scout leader molested him in the early 1980s. punitive damages will be fixed later. the trial was marked by the use of the boy scouts' so-called "perversion files" on alleged pedophiles. those are some of the day's main stories. i'll be back at the end of the program with a preview of what you'll find tonight on the newshour's web site. for now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we continue our spotlight series here in florida focusing on health care. newshour health correspondent betty anne bowser begins by introducing us to four individuals who have been watching the debate closely. >> reporter: florida ranks second in the nation in the number of people on medicare with just about three million enrollees. but americans of all ages are eternally drawn to the sunshine state for its casual way of living. older americans may come to sun city center 25 miles south of tampa. life's easy here. lie by the pool, take in a leisurely came of bridge or kanasta. deand john
PBS
Apr 14, 2010 6:00pm EDT
can't have bank of america operating in bankruptcy. you need some kind of resolution authority. you need to be able to step in and take them over. in general you need to have the ain't to keep the financial system from sinking. it's all well and good to say that the federal reserve oversight means -- is an admigd that bannings are too big or connected to fail, and to a certain extent that's true, but as long as you have a way of dealing with it that doesn't involve massive taxpayer bailouts and doesn't involve huge systemic consequences for the economy as a whole, that's a pretty good way of going forward >> brown: mr. wollaston, there are many other parts of this, we can't go through each one, a clearing house to for derivatives, consumer agency-- are they all wrapped up in your sense of overregulating these institutions and keeping them from innovation or holding down credit, ways that would affect them that way? >> no, actually , most important issues are this question of federal regulation, federal reserve regulation of these large financial institution, and incidentally, we're
PBS
Apr 16, 2010 6:00pm EDT
goldlman sachs and other big banks. there was a big case with bank of america that was more known in public. people were surprised by the goldlman sachs case and i think there was surprise there were no settlements in the works. the s.e.c. is under a new team and trying to show the world post-madoff they can reform themselves. but really, the devil will be in the details as the court case unfolds and it could be, actually, years and years before any kind of resolutions, which shows how difficult this is. this is dealing with conduct from early 2007, it's 2010 now, and the court case could be 2011 or 2012. four or five years between conduct and resolution and that shows how difficult it is to prosecute these kind of cases. >> lehrer: zach, thank you very much. >> brown: now, to the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan in our newsroom. >> sreenivasan: the goldman sachs news rattled wall street after two months of steady gains. the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 126 points to close at 11,018. the nasdaq fell 34 points to close at 2,481. for the week, the dow gained a fracti
PBS
Apr 22, 2010 8:00pm EDT
. they are america's great coastal estuaries and they are in peril. >> i would put puget sound in the intensive care unit. the situation is critical. >> the chesapeake bay is like the canary in the coal mine. it is an indicator of what we are now learning to expect in any body of water across the planet. >> narrator: three decades after the clean water act, frontline takes a hard look at why america has failed for so long to clean up the nation's waterways. >> agriculture is by far the largest source of pollution to the all of the waters in the country. >we're not talking about little ma and pa on the farm anymore. we're talking about industrial production. it is industrial waste. >> narrator: and how contaminated waters threaten not only wildlife... >> you have frogs with six legs, male frogs with ovaries. >> narrator: ...but ultimately threaten our own health as well. >> the same things that are killing the animals will kill people, too. >> narrator: in a two hour special report, frontline correspondent hedrick smith uncovers the danger to the nation's waterways. tracking new threats. r)vyou are l
PBS
Apr 17, 2010 4:00am EDT
those black september days a year and a half ago, the feds decided to let lehman go. this led to america's biggest bankruptcy ever. in an admirable work of journalism this week, the new york "times" reported that lehman secretly controlled a company called hudson castle, and used it to borrow money as well as to hide bad investments in commercial real estate and sub-prime mortgages. but the week's award for sheer gall goes to a chicago-area hedge fund called magnetar, named after a kind of neutron star that spews deadly radiation across the galaxies. thanks to the teamwork of the investigative reporting web site propublica, n.p.r.'s "planet money" project, and "this american life," we learned magnetar worked with investment banks to create toxic c.d.o.s- collateralized debt obligations-- securities backed by sub-prime mortgages the management knew were bad. and then, magnetar took that knowledge and bet against the very same investments they had recommended to buyers. selling short and making a fortune. and late this week, the securities and exchange commission charged the godfather of w
PBS
Apr 1, 2010 6:00pm EDT
provided by: >> every business day, bank of america lends nearly $3 billion to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses in every corner of the economy. america-- growing stronger everyday. >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland to haran's best selling whole wheat, while keeping 60 billion pounds of carbon out of the atmosphere every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. the national science foundation. supporting education and research across all fields of science and engineering. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: there were fresh developments today in several points around the world all critical to u.s. policymakers. margaret warner reports. >> reporter: president obama put foreign affairs back in the foreground this week with a surprise sunday trip to afghanistan. he privately urged afghan president hamid karzai to work h
PBS
Apr 2, 2010 6:00pm EDT
unacceptable, and no amount of taxpayer-funded temporary census workers can mask the pummeling america's employers are taking from washington democrats' job- killing agenda." but there've also been signs of hope this week in reports that consumers are spending more, and that manufacturing grew in march at its fastest pace in five years. with to help us take a look at the new report and what it tells us about the larger economic picture we turn to glenn hubbard, dean of the business school at columbia university. he was chairman of the council of economic advisors for president george w. bush. and laura tyson, professor of economics at the hosk school of business at the university of california berkeley. she was chair of president clinton's council of economic advisors, and is now a member of president obama's economic advisory board. thank you both for being with us. and laura tyson, i'll turn to you first. how do you read this >> well, i read it as encouraging. but encouraging and moderate. it's encouraging because we have pri employment growth. and actually the revisions to this repo
PBS
Apr 6, 2010 9:00pm EDT
their experiences. >> the enemies of the united states of america. >> the enemies of the united states of america... >> you should record that. >> oh. >> you're not recording. >> scranton: as i did on an earlier film, i set up a virtual embed... >> so, you can mount it on the dashboard... >> okay... >> ...to the side, i mean, you can mount this thing anywhere. >> scranton: ...which involves giving cameras to the soldiers... it's up to you to tell me what's working for you. ...and establishing a close, two-way working relationship while they're in iraq. >> cam control, manual. night shot, on. >> scranton: yeah, there we go. see? the green night shot... the soldiers would be the storytellers, not just subjects. >> then you can just do a quick little... >> i told them we would tell the story of their war through their eyes, wherever it took them. >> there it is, the silver and white bird of destiny. >> tell me about your going away at the first time on block leave. block leave, by the way, is when you get to go home before you go overseas. you get to spend nine days at home. so, did veronica come do
PBS
Apr 7, 2010 5:30pm EDT
seems to be sending a message. remember, a few days ago he diatribe against america and members of the u.n., saying that they were responsible signalling that president karzai is willing to make a cooling of tensions between the two>>>> thr us. janeiro, at least 100 people have been known to have died inn shantytowns. our correspondent is there. >>the rain might be less intense, but the risk landslides remains very high. unstable. house up there that collapsed under the mud. firefighters are, , , , , , , ,t the people are impatient, attempting to take hands. not a, houses collapsed and people died during the rainy season. but not in this scale. the problem is that many of the shantytownshillsides where thins heavy rain was exactly what they had for the last 48 hours. it had not rained this much in such a bbc news, rio de janeiro. blockade that has been up for almost three years is be needed to stop weapons smuggling to palestinian militants. thousands of goods were smuggled expanding systt o o o o o o o o- tunnels. we have achieved a rare footage of entire cars driving through cli>> deep
PBS
Apr 9, 2010 10:00pm EDT
battleground continues to dismay, discourage, and enrage. america's designated driver there, hamid karzai, is proving increasingly unstable behind the wheel. the united states put karzai in power and our soldiers have been fighting and dying on his behalf ever since. despite widespread corruption in his government. now he's making threats against the western coalition that is shedding blood and treasure on his behalf. even more disturbing, for the moment, are the civilian deaths from nighttime raids and aerial bombings by american and other nato troops. just this week, we learned of an apparent cover-up following a special forces raid in february that killed five civilians, including three women, two of whom were pregnant. it's believed bullets were gouged from the women's bodies to conceal evidence of american involvement. this slaughter of innocents has led the pro-american "economist" magazine to question whether our entire effort in afghanistan "has been nothing but a meaningless exercise of misguided violence." with me is a man with first-hand experience of war. andrew bacevich serve
PBS
Apr 19, 2010 6:00pm EDT
america the church has responded dramatically and in many cases very effectively in terms of responding to the needs of people who were victimized. and i think whatever is erupting now in ireland and germany and other places in the world, i think they're going to follow the pattern of what the u.s. bishops did here. >> reporter: the archdiocese says the steps taken were man dayed by the u.s. conference of catholic bishops in 2002 and are not a new policy. but speed still surprised many. >> that is a huge change . we'll see how it, you know, proceeds from here. >> reporter: stan current remains skeptical. he first became an advocate for abuse survivors in 2002 while living in boston. >> confronting the church was almost like confronting your mother. there seemed to be denial and just trying to sweep everything under the carpet. >> reporter: he says that after years of trying to comfort victims and demanding the church accept responsibility he finally left the church altogether although he says he is still a devout christian. >> it's really about having a personal relationship with the lo
PBS
Apr 29, 2010 12:30pm EDT
, new business creates jobs. as it happens here, all the new jobs in america are really created by the small business. and how we encourage that, how... what the governments in our part of the world need to do to really help the culture of entrepreneurship to move forward we have a lot of things to learn from the united states, actually. >> rose: you were born in sudan. >> yes. >> rose: you were an engineer. >> yes, and i did work a little bit in sudan in the postal service, as you call it. then i went to u.k. to do my masters in ph.d. and i ended up as an academic. my specialty was in mobile communications. >> rose: what can be said about your timing is amazing. >> it was wonderful. this was long before cellular came. so that was a subject of my research. when british telecom was about to launch the first mobile service in the u.k., they invited me to go on as technical director. so i was an engineer. it was an accident after that, charlie. i never dreamed to be a businessman. i never planned to be a businessman. i got fed up with the way things happen where half of the company
PBS
Apr 2, 2010 9:30pm EDT
american troops. >> we did not choose this war. this was not an act of america wanting to expand its influence. >> but did he make any headway with the government in afghanistan plagued by corruption? and the f.b.i. rounds up nine members of a militia-style group in michigan charged with plotting violence against police. >> they could kill a lot of people just by themselves. >> what does it tell us about the threat of domestic terrorism? those stories this week from the reporters who cover them. dan balz of "the washington post," john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times," martha rad ditz of nbc news and michael duffy of time magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> i've been growing algae for 35 years. most people try and get rid of algae. we're trying to grow it. the algae are very beautiful. they come in blue or red, golden, green. it can be converted int
PBS
Apr 9, 2010 9:30pm EDT
that anticipates the future today. >> and help protect america everywhere. from the battle space to cyberspace. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to give our best for america's best. >> that's why we're here. ♪ snothse we are one people ♪ ♪ >> what do you care about? introducing the project. we move the world forward. >> additional funding for "washington week" is provided by exxon mobile and the annenberg foundation and the public broadcasting and contributions from viewers like you. thank you. once again, hive from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. after supreme court justice john paul stevens, the longest member of the bench and a liberal announced his pending environment, the president praised him and hinted at what is to come. >> while we cannot replace justice stevens' experience or wisdom. i'll seek somebody with similar qualities. independent mind and record of excellence and integrity and a fierce dedication to the ruling of law and a keen understanding of how the law affects the daily lives of the american people. gwen: before w
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